Mission Statement

Social and institutional oppression exists everywhere. Understanding exactly how it occurs on a day to day basis is the only way to end it. Oppression happens in different ways for different people, and solving these social justice problems must recognize the individual experiences as well as the intersectionality of oppressive forces.

This site is intended to be a project in documenting all types of social and institutional oppression, also known as the kyriarchy. The events documented here will be limited to events that occurred in the United States in 2017 and beyond. 

Each post includes a brief description of what occurred, and then an explanation of why it is an example of the kyriarchy. This site isn’t meant to discern the facts or the guilt or innocence of any particular case. This site is not a journalistic outlet, and no names are provided in the posts. The purpose of the site is to provide context. Effect is more important than intent.

Intent doesn’t matter here. Impact does.

Definitions

Social justice terms are used regularly within this site. Here is a helpful list of definitions.

Kyriarchy: “a social system or set of connecting social systems built around domination, oppression, and submission… Kyriarchy encompasses sexism, racism, homophobia, classism, economic injustice, colonialism, militarism, ethnocentrism, anthropocentrism, and other forms of dominating hierarchies in which the subordination of one person or group to another is internalized and institutionalized.”

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Patriarchy: “is a social system in which males hold primary power and predominate in roles of political leadership, moral authority, social privilege and control of property. In the domain of the family, fathers or father-figures hold authority over women and children. Some patriarchal societies are also patrilineal, meaning that property and title are inherited by the male lineage.

“Historically, patriarchy has manifested itself in the social, legal, political, religious and economic organization of a range of different cultures.[1] Even if not explicitly defined to be by their own constitutions and laws, most contemporary societies are, in practice, patriarchal.[2]”

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Institutional Racism: "a pattern of social institutions — such as governmental organizations, schools, banks, and courts of law — giving negative treatment to a group of people based on their race. "

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Homophobia: “irrational fear of, aversion to, or discrimination against homosexuality or homosexuals”

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Transphobia: “irrational fear of, aversion to, or discrimination against transgender or transsexual people”

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Biphobia: discrimination, erasure, or distrust of bisexual people.

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Ableism: “discrimination or prejudice against individuals with disabilities”

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Xenophobia: “fear and hatred of strangers or foreigners or of anything that is strange or foreign”

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Domestic Violence: “the inflicting of physical injury by one family or household member on another; also: a repeated or habitual pattern of such behavior”

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Mass shooting: “A mass shooting is an incident involving multiple victims of firearms-related violence. ... Another unofficial definition of a mass shooting is an event involving the shooting (not necessarily resulting in death) of four or more people with no cooling-off period.”

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Economic injustice: “Economic inequality is the difference found in various measures of economic well-being among individuals in a group, among groups in a population, or among countries. Economic inequality sometimes refers to income inequality, wealth inequality, or the wealth gap.”

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